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Bringing your pet (other than a dog, cat or ferret) into Ireland

The rules on bringing your pet into Ireland (for example, on holiday or because you are taking up residence here) change depending on which country you are travelling from.

Your pet must be accompanied by original paperwork, not copies.  Your pet must arrive in Ireland five days before or after you travel (but it can be accompanied by someone else).  Five is the maximum number of animals allowed to travel with you. These rules apply no matter which country you are travelling from.  There are different rules if you’re bringing your pet dog, cat or ferret into Ireland, click HERE for details.

If you are travelling to Ireland to sell your pet, for a change of ownership, or if the pet is not travelling within five days of your travel, there are different rules.

Click HERE for details on bringing your pet bird into Ireland.  A pet birds is considered to be a bird of any species except fowl, turkeys, guinea fowl, ducks, geese, quails, pigeons, partridges and ratites reared or kept in captivity for breeding, the production of meat or eggs for consumption, or for re-stocking supplies of game), which is not being traded commercially and travels with the owner or with a person representing the owner.

Click HERE for details on bring a pet rodent or rabbit to Ireland from another EU country or from Andorra, the Faroe Islands, Greenland, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Monaco, Norway, San Marino, Switzerland and the Vatican City State.

Import into Ireland of Pet Birds

Pet Birds are birds:

  • of any species except fowl, turkeys, guinea fowl, ducks, geese, quails, pigeons, partridges and ratites  reared or kept in captivity for breeding, the production of meat or eggs for consumption, or for re-stocking supplies of game),
  • which are not being traded,
  • which travel with the owner or with a person representing the owner.

Your bird is considered a pet if it is travelling with you because you are relocating to Ireland, or are coming to Ireland on holiday.

Bringing pet birds into Ireland from EU countries

You may bring your pet bird to Ireland from another EU country or from Andorra, the Faeroe Islands, Greenland, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Monaco, Norway, San Marino, Switzerland and the Vatican City State if:

Bringing pet birds into Ireland from a non-EU country

You may bring your pet bird (or birds, but no more than five in total) into to Ireland from a non-EU country if:

1. The bird is accompanied on the journey by you or a person acting on your behalf;

2. The bird is individually identified.

3. You have a veterinary health certificate signed by an official veterinarian to confirm compliance with the pre-export requirements.

4. Member States shall authorise the movement from third countries of live pet birds solely where the consignment consists of not more than five birds AND:

a. the birds come from an OIE member country falling within the competence of a Regional Commission listed in Part A of Annex I, OR

b. the birds come from an OIE member country falling within the competence of a Regional Commission listed in Part B of Annex I on condition that the birds:

i. have undergone isolation for 30 days prior to export at the place of departure in a third country listed in Part 1 of  Annex I or Part 1 of Annex II to Commission Regulation (EU) No 206/2010 ( 1 ), OR

ii. have undergo quarantine for 30 days after import into the Member State of destination on premises approved in accordance with Article 6(1) of Commission Regulation (EC) No 318/2007 ( 2 ), OR

iii. have  within the last six months and not later than 60 days prior to dispatch from the third country, been vaccinated, and at least on one occasion revaccinated, against avian influenza using an H5 vaccine approved for the species concerned in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions, OR

iv. have been in isolation for at least 10 days prior to export and have undergone a test to detect the avian influenza H5N1 antigen or genome as laid down in the Chapter on avian influenza of the Manual of Diagnostic tests and Vaccines for Terrestrial Animals, as regularly updated by the OIE, carried out on a sample taken not earlier than the third day of isolation.

5. Compliance with the above conditions shall be certified by an official (State) veterinarian in the Non EU country of dispatch in accordance with the model certificate provided for in Annex II, in the case of the conditions provided for in paragraph 3 b. ii. an owner’s declaration Annex III) must be completed.

Persons wishing to import pet birds from Non-EU countries are asked to apply on the attached form to livetrade.@agriculture.gov.ie for an import permit so as to facilitate the necessary documentary and identity checks upon import.  Applications should be made in sufficient time to enable the pre-export requirements to be completed.

Enquiries to: livetrade.@agriculture.gov.ie

Requirements for importing pet rodents and lagomorphs [rabbits] from EU Member States

You can bring a pet rodent or rabbit to Ireland from another EU country or from Andorra, the Faroe Islands, Greenland, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Monaco, Norway, San Marino, Switzerland and the Vatican City State if:

You can bring a pet rodent or rabbit to Ireland from certain countries outside the EU but you must apply for a licence by filling in and sending Application to Import Pet Birds into Ireland from a non-EU country application form to livetrade@agriculture.gov.ie You must submit this application at least 2 months before your date of travel to Ireland. The licence sets out the requirements for import which include a veterinary health certificate, and the animals must be transported in a container which complies with the International Air Transport Association (IATA) Live Animal Regulations and must be secured with a seal or lock.

Application should be made in sufficient time to enable the pre-export requirements to be completed.

An advance notice of import is also required.

For any non-domestic rodent or rabbit kept as a pet which is listed on the CITES list of endangered species, you must check with the National Parks and Wildlife Service (www.npws.ie) if a CITES licence is required.

Enquiries to: livetrade@agriculture.gov.ie